Sino-Japanese War 1894-95: Memorobilia
 
 
Contact
: (61 8) 64989833

Mob: 0405 698 799
admin@galleryeast.com.au
menu


 

 

c.1890s. Sino-Japanese War. Korean Soldiers & Chinese POWs
ongyang (1894)

Commissioned by the new pro-Japanese Korean government to forcibly expel Chinese forces, led mixed Japanese brigades numbering about 4,000 on a rapid forced march from Seoul south toward Asan Bay to face 3,500 Chinese troops garrisoned at Seonghwan Station east of Asan and Kongju. On 28 July 1894, the two forces met just outside Asan in an engagement that lasted till 0730 hours the next morning. The Chinese gradually lost ground to the superior Japanese numbers, and finally broke and fled towards Pyongyang. Chinese casualties amounted to 500 killed and wounded, compared to 82 Japanese casualties. On 1 August, war was officially declared between China and Japan. By 4 August, the remaining Chinese forces in Korea retreated to the northe rn city of Pyongyang, where they were met by troops sent from China. The 13,000–15,000 defenders made defensive repairs to the city, hoping to check the Japanese advance. On 15 September, they converged on the city of Pyongyang from several directions. The Japanese assaulted the city and eventually defeated the Chinese by an attack from the rear; the defenders surrendered. Taking advantage of heavy rainfall overnight, the remaining Chinese troops escaped Pyongyang and headed northeast toward the coastal city of Uiju. Casualties were 2,000 killed and around 4,000 wounded for the Chinese, while the Japanese casualties totaled 102 men killed, 433 wounded, and 33 missing. In the early morning of 16 September, the entire Japanese army entered Pyongyang.
                             


 
     
 
 
 
Copyright Gallery East. All rights reserved |

Site last updated on March, 2005 |

Design Galleryeast &EAT